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Linde’s new liquid CO2 plant in Thailand

05 March 2013

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On 18 January 2013, the Linde (Thailand) Public Company Limited, a member of The Linde Group, announced that it will be investing approximately about 12 million EUROS to build a new merchant CO2 plant in Map Ta Phut, Rayong. 
Mr. Keerin Chutumstid, the Managing Director of Linde Thailand, stated: “We continue to see rising demand from our customers in the energy, chemical, fabrication and food & beverage sectors, and have therefore decided to invest in a new carbon dioxide production facility to ensure that Linde is well-placed to meet the increasing requirements of our customers and effectively support their growth and export competitiveness."

As Thailand’s leading gases company, Linde Thailand, formerly known as Thai Industrial Gases (TIG), has the most comprehensive industrial, specialty and medical gases product portfolio and the largest direct sales network in the country. Once the new liquid CO2 plant is completed in 2014, it will have a production capacity of 300 tons per day (tpd), increasing Linde Thailand’s total CO2 production capacity to 1,200 tpd. According to Mr. Chutumstid, this will increase the company’s ability to provide support to customers beyond Thailand’s borders, across the wider ASEAN Economic Community (AEC). The additional CO2 plant will reinforce Linde Thailand’s position as a major CO2 production hub in the region.

Mr. Bernd Eulitz, Regional Business Unit Head for Linde in South & East Asia, said, "Thailand's economy has shown great resilience and continues to expand steadily even in today's more uncertain global macroeconomic climate. This latest investment, which follows our investment of approximately 90 million Euros to build what will be Thailand's largest liquid air separation plant with production capacity of 800 tpd of liquefied gases once it is ready in 2013, demonstrates Linde's confidence in Thailand as a very attractive market with excellent long term growth prospects."

About Linde (Thailand) Public Company Limited

Since 1970, Linde (Thailand) Public Company Limited has been the leading industrial gas supplier in the country. The company manufactures and distributes industrial, specialty and medical gases to a variety of industries. Linde (Thailand) provides a full range of related services including the installation of gas equipment, pipelines, on site plants and associated engineering services. The company also supplies a wide range of welding goods and safety products. Linde (Thailand) has over 40 years of experience and currently operates more than 20 major installations throughout Thailand.

About The Linde Group

The Linde Group is a world-leading gases and engineering company with around 62,000 employees in more than 100 countries worldwide. The Group’s strategy emphasises long-term profitable growth and focuses on the expansion of its international business with forward-looking products and services. The Group is committed to technologies and products that unite the goals of customer value and sustainable development.

Useful contacts

Jon Black
Head of Chemicals & Refrigerants at Linde Gas




Comments

Klaas Visser

KAV Consulting Pty Ltd
An ultimate daily production rate of 1200 tonnes - more than 400,000 tonnes per annum - would be enough to charge most if not all existing CO2 refigeration systems on this planet. So I assume that this large CO2 production is destined to be used as an expendable refrigerant. This raises a number of questions as follows.

1. How much of the proposed production has a sufficiently low water content, say less than 4 ppm, to be used in a freezer cascade system? This is about Medical specification CO2 purity.

2. How much Natural Gas needs to be burned to achieve this daily production and how much detrimental environmental does such a combustion process have?

3. How much electrical energy is consumed in the refining process to separate the CO2 from the stream of combustion gases?

4. Adding the two main energy consumers in the above two items together, how much PRIMARY energy, i.e. energy in the fuel consumed in the gas plus the energy consumed at the power station, is consumed to create one tonne of industrial expendable CO2 refrigerant?

5. Comparing the total amount of primary energy consumed to obtain one kg of expendable CO2 with the primary energy used to create the identical refrigeration effect of one kg of expendable CO2 refrigerant, how much more primary energy is used by the expendable CO2 refrigeration process? I suspect this ratio is quite high.

6. If it takes 150 kWh to freeze one tonne of food and the electrical energy costs $0.20/kWh, the freezing cost is 3 cents/kg, the primary energy consmption is 1.8 MJ/kg at a total electrical grid efficiency of 30% between the generator and the refrigeration electrical energy consumer and the CO2 emissions are 0.12 kg/kg of frozen food, how does expendable CO2 compare to mechanical freezing in terms of freezing cost in $//kg, primary energy consumptionin in terms of MJ/kg and CO2 emissions due to total primary energy consumption in kg of CO2 per kg of food frozen.

7. IF THE CO2 IS SYNTHESIZED BY BURNING NATURAL GAS, THE EXPENDABLE CO2 CONSUMPTION ITSELF RANGING FROM 1 TO 1.3 KG/KG OF FOOD FROZEN NEEDS TO BE COUNTED AS CO2 EMISSINS ITSELF. THIS IS ABOUT 10 TIMES AS MUCH AS THE EMISSIONS KG CREATED BY THE MECHANICAL FREEZING PROCESS AND MORE WHEN THE PRIMARY ENERGY CONSUMED IN THE GAS FEED STOCK AND THE PRODUCTION PROCESS.

8. The last time I looked at it about 10 years ago, the expendable CO2 consumable cost was about $0.15/kg of product frozen, which is 5 TIMES AS HIGH AS THE PRESENT SPECIFIC ENERGY COST IN kWh/TONNE OR KG FROZEN OF A REASONABLY EFFICIENT MECAHICAL FREEZING SYSTEM. I WONDER HOW MUCH THE EXPENDABLE CO2 COSTS HAVE RISEN

9. In conclusion I say that gold, aluminium and synthesized CO2 are all packaged energy! It is also fair to conclude, that synthesized CO2 to be used as an expendable refrigerant is an act of environmental vandelism of the highest order. The use of expandable synthesized CO2 refigerant is diametrically opposedto the benefits of CO2 as a refrigerant in a closed system - a form of sequestration - and as such expendable CO2 is anethema to the laudable and increasingly succesful aims of R744.

I would be interested to hear from LINDE what they think the freezing costs, primary energy consumption and emissions per tonne or kg of frozen food produced.

I specifically exclude CO2 recoverd from industrial pocesses like beer brewing and champagne, which I favour greatly.

With best wishes and kind regards

Klaas Visser.
added 2013-03-06 02:34:00

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